Playstation PS4 Top 5 List

Thule Esperada

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1. Bloodborne. Fromsoftware's A-game production, a title that oozes atmosphere, great art direction, fun level design, satisfying combat and an amazing Gothic/Lovecraftian setting.

2. Doom. An excelent reboot to a classic series. Fun, solid and fast paced gameplay with good visual feedback make for an exrtremely enjoyable, if brief experience.

3. Wolfenstein TNO/TOB. A pair of games that perfectly mix old school run and gun fps design with modern mechanics. Combine with a good story and sympathetic characters with a nice ammount of depth, and you have a winner formula.

4. Resident Evil/REmake. A bit of a cheat, I know. But the game's level design, atmosphere and classic survival horror style make for one of my all time favourite games.

5. Metro Redux. Anothe cheat tbh. Another game with amazing atmosphere and subtle narrative tecniques. The overall fps gameplay is nothing special, but serves the game adequately to create an experience that's more than just the sum of it's parts.

This isn't really a list of titles that I think are amazing. Outside of Bloodborne I just picked the games that were the most memorable of a list of mostly uninspired titles. This generation so far hasn't produced enough titles to actually justify itelf or a title that would be amazing. And frankly the best titles consist mostly of remasters or re-releases of last-gen games.
 

GothicSyn

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I couldn't pick 5 quite honestly. Namely because 90% of games I've played on PS4 are remasters! And 90% of my time has been spent on FF14! So I'll just say the ones I can think of off hand I've enjoyed at some point.

Wont put Bloodborne in here the issues I had with that game were unbelievable at times, so much to the point it caused my first genuine rage quite in over 10 years!! Dark Souls 3 somehow feels forced and lack luster.

Watchdogs was fun, The Bioshock Remasters looked amazing for the most part, Skyrim remaster looks as pretty as ever (Would have been better if they'd fixed all those pesky bugs). Resident Evil Revelations 2 looks and plays good, (It was built for PS4 then down scaled for PS3 so it actually looks as good as it should on PS4) and actually feels like a Resident Evil game. WWE 2K17 has kept me happily distracted for a while, but yea not exactly a to entry! ESO isn't a bad play for those who are a fan of the Elder Scrolls series, it's made huge leaps since it's original release. And Arkham Knight, yup pretty much everything I've played on PS4 that isn't a total port of a PS3 title.
 

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As we're approaching the end of the PS4's Lifespan, thought I'd give this a go - of course there's a lot still to come within the next year so it could easily change!

1. Life Is Strange
Easily the most compelling game I have played this gen, I played the 1st Episode one night and couldn't put it down and completed it the following day! I love games with interactive narrative and choice with consequence and this game delivers. I also dig having an introverted lead character in Max.

2. Gravity Rush - Remastered
What a thrill! I know I'm cheating as it's a Vita port but I can't bypass this! The games art direction is rich and full of charm, I really enjoyed the flying mechanics too. Sadly the sequel was a mess, leaving all the interesting plot threads from the 1st game until post-game... Gravity Rush 2 almost feels like an odd spin-off it's so bizarre but I still adore the 1st game!

3. Resident Evil 7
Wow, Resident Evil is a series I have enjoyed in the past a lot but with the PS4 it has really put work into revitalising the series after last gens mishaps (Though I will add, despite being terrible RE games RE5 & 6 make for some of the best co-op experiences on the PS4!). Resident Evil 7 is it's own beast though, taking a completely new perspective yet retaining the survival horror/puzzle elements it's probably the closest feeling to the series roots we've had yet feels so refreshing! What I also love is that while Ethan is almost a silent protagonist he has presence enough to be a relevant character within the game! More Silent Protagonists need to be like this!

4. Rocket League (Pre-2019)
I don't play the game much these fays as they changed the rules but me and my friend played this every Friday for a good 2-3 years! What makes it so appealing is that we can play it Split-Screen & compete online, so many games fail to offer such Multi-player options - which makes it awful when I have 200+ games for the console and I can't even suggest anything...) But Rocket League recently changed all the rules to gaining points and now we sort of feel that the game has lost it's spark.

5. Yakuza 0
The story of Yakuza's rise from niche to Triple-A tier is worth celebrating alone, I remember on the PS3 how unapproachable this series was that we didn't even get Yakuza 5 until years later and it was digital only. Now we have a prequel, 2 Remakes, 3 Remasters and 2 Sequels all on 1 system! That is mental! I feel the best of the lot is Yakuza 0, while I sort of wish we controlling Kiryu at a younger age, the game has a very compelling story and tons of content to boot - if your interested in the series and looking for a starting point try Yakuza Kiwami, as it's more of a bitesized version
 
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1. Persona 5
I came into Persona 5 as a complete rookie, having never played a Persona game previously. I originally bought it on a whim having heard great things about it, but didn't actually play it for at least a year, I think. Admittedly, it took me a couple of hours to get into the game - that couple of hours turned into a combined total of 181 hours by time I'd fully finished with it - and one of the few games I genuinely felt saddened that it came to an end on my first playthrough. So what better thing to do than a second playthrough and another 80 hours? Yes, it sucks to be a completionist.

Having been to Japan, which is by far my favourite country, I fell in love with Persona 5's Japanese culture. However, I certainly don't think this game is for everyone. It incorporates an easy mode - which really is easy - but to fully get the most out of the game, it's a commitment. A long commitment. The dungeon crawling probably, at a guess, makes up 40% of the game, leaving the majority of the game revolving around building relationships and improving social stats - which are actually needed to build relationships further. It is heavily time management based, so for anyone who prefers games with a lot of action, Persona 5 probably isn't for you.

The protagonists and their relationships are the heart and soul of the game and at times their backstories, and how to save them, really does become dark and gritty. Whilst it never dives into it at a seriously detailed level, there are explicit themes carried out by each of the antagonists - sexual exploitation, corporate exploitation, child slavery & suicide, to name a few. What Persona 5 manages to do, is find a balance between when to push these themes, and when to reel it in and focus on light hearted elements.

The main theme song for Persona 5 is catchy as hell, too.


2. Kingdom Hearts III
In no way is Kingdom Hearts III perfect in any sense, 'technically' it isn't as strong as any of my other top 5 games, but it's a franchise I grew up with and love for all its flaws - in fact, the narrative is so convoluted, every time I feel I've nailed it, I realise I've far from done it. It's genuinely insane that there's a 350 page Google document about a Sleeping Realm theory. The Disney worlds are more or less standalone from the Xehanort saga and could comfortably be swapped with any other Disney franchise without affecting the game - but Square Enix did do a great job with the worlds they had.

I really liked the closure for all the characters - until the ReMIND trailer was recently released, so I again question everything that has happened - particularly as to where Yozora now fits in.

The graphics and gameplay are the best in the franchise, which should be expected due to the mix consoles and spread over nearly two decades.


3. The Last of Us Remastered
Wow. Where to start on this one?

Sarah dying right off the bat. Tess following shortly afterwards. Henry shooting his brother, Sam, then himself out of despair. Thinking Joel had died and then having to rescue Ellie from dying... the storyline is unwaveringly relentless, bringing out the worst in people in a post-apocalyptic era. It is gripping from the first moment until the last. I've yet to play to the Left Behind DLC, but it is on my list of things to finish - I've only heard good things about it.

The upgrade to 60FPS also makes the gameplay a much smoother experience; with a constant feel of urgency and tension, it really does make you think as to when the best time is to engage in combat or attempt to stealthily work your way through an area unnoticed. Having crafting set to real time, rather than the pause menu, also gives the player a predicament as to when the best time is to do so - again, enhancing the sense of urgency.

Graphically... stunning. Naughty Dog did a great job in the first place with the original Last of Us release, pushing the Playstation 3 to its absolute limit. The upgraded textures and lighting make for a better visual feast for sure, albeit, as the original game was gorgeous anyway, the difference isn't earth-shattering - but it is noticeable.

4. Uncharted 4: A Thief's End
Potentially a slightly controversial opinion, but I think Uncharted 4 is the best Uncharted. The gameplay is undoubtedly smoother than previous titles, but as with graphics, this should be a given with the advancements in technology; stealth, driving, shooting, fighting, rope swinging et al., all feel much slicker and fluid.The AI are also much more intelligent and tactical, making the combat sequences more enjoyable.

The storyline is the where the game excels for me. Gone are the days where Nathan Drake and Elena Fisher are in it solely for the thrill of the adventure. It's now a genuine conflict for Nathan and the life he once had - the life he's always had - and the life he now has. The relationship between Sam and Nathan throws in curve balls as expected, but the relationship between Nathan and Elena is when the story shines - the intimate conflict between the two when Elena arrives at Madagascar and calls out Nathan's denial and questions their entire relationship, is one of the best scenes I've witnessed in gaming. The 'drive to Devon' scene with the 'For Better or Worse' playing in the background is a beautifully powerful moment in the game, despite having very little to do. It always felt to me, even having recently played it again, that Nathan and Elena were at breaking point.

5. Bioshock Infinite
This one was a toss up between the original Bioshock and Bioshock Infinite, but the additional Burial at Sea DLC swung it towards Bioshock Infinite.

Whilst I don't think Infinite had the same suspense as Bioshock, I enjoyed the more mature, complex themes in Infinite than seen in previous Bioshock entries. Irrational Games weren't afraid to touch on the contexts of racism (clearly seen in the opening chapters of Columbia), xenophobia (the hatred towards Booker DeWitt as an 'outsider') and religion (worshipping of Zachary Comstock as God), as well as the idea of social uprising / civil war. I thought the parallel universe concept was great as well and really pulled together by Elizabeth, who was a brilliant character; the idea that there are infinite universes ranging from minute to major changes - you could be old in one universe, young in another. Male or female. War-hero or war criminal. Alive or dead. The possibilities are endless.

I really enjoyed the gameplay mechanics, although this has been a bit controversial as Infinite leaned more towards being a shooter-based combat and less about plasmids. The overall design of Columbia was amazing and a stark contrast to Rapture - goodbye to gloomy, leaky, horror-esque designs and hello to vivid, warm, vibrancy.

The reason Burial at Sea was key for me was, as good as Infinite and Columbia are, Bioshock was an outstanding game and made you yearn for more of Rapture. It wasn't as an intense and suspenseful Rapture as Bioshock, but it did give a lengthy look at the pre-collapse of Rapture. It was nice to see how 1950s Rapture was prior to collapse and just as interesting to see early-Atlas, early-Splicers and the insanity of Sander Cohen. It was intriguing to see how Irrational Games pulled Rapture and Columbia together through Tears - Andrew Ryan was outstanding as always!
 
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