Phils Game/Pop Music Similarities #171 - Il mio villaggio di anime perdute

PhilsPhindings

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Featuring Final Fantasy IX and traditional.

Greetings fellow game music lovers,

yes, I'm still not that good in shape, nevertheless in order to let you know I'm still there I want to give you another Final Fantasy month release, albeit brief. It is about the song "Bran Bal, the Village Without Souls" from Final Fantasy IX (1999), the song that plays in the town where the Genomes live on the alternate planet Terra:


The current hypothesis is that has been inspired by traditional italian music. The source this assumption are two samples by japanese artists that remind me a lot of this in curvature and tone.

The first one is by Takashi Sato with the title 黒い瞳~アモーレ・ミオ~ (Amore Mio) from 1987 which features this sequence:


Then we have a song by a folk rock band - Folk Muk - 長崎 from their 1975 album 陰 And 陽:


The comments identify this song as consisting of pastoral guitar strummings which again points toward traditional origins.

I wonder if both songs a based on a famous traditional italian tune?

Phil out.
 

Dionysos

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Hey. Hope you are well. Sorry it has been a while since I've responded to some of these.

I can certainly hear the similarities that the examples you cite share with Bran Bal, the Village Without Souls.

I unfortunately cannot place any specific traditional Italian tune, but I agree with you that it is the sort of tune I could easily imagine in that style and might well exist out there somewhere. It has that sort of melancholic-yet-catchy feel that you find in some Italian folk songs. Would be quite fitting for the final song of the planet Terra (which happens to be named after the Roman/Latin counterpart to the earth goddess Gaia).
 
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